/archives

Cancer / Oncology

This category contains 26 posts

Can dogs detect cancer?

Dogs have an incredibly sensitive sense of smell. They are able to detect various types of cancer through odor signatures in a person’s breath, urine, and skin. Here, we look at how dogs can detect cancer, the types of cancer they can smell, and how medical professionals can use dogs in cancer research and diagnostics.

Cancer research: Zombie genes and elephants

Elephants are affected by cancer much less frequently than humans. By unraveling their DNA, researchers gain new insight into anticancer mechanisms.

Immunotherapy trial cures Tasmanian devils of DFTD

An international study involving multiple institutions over six years has shown that immunotherapy can cure Tasmanian devils of the deadly devil facial tumour disease (DFTD).

Immunotherapy trial cures Tasmanian devils of DFTD

An international study involving multiple institutions over six years has shown that immunotherapy can cure Tasmanian devils of the deadly devil facial tumour disease (DFTD).

Tasmanian devils evolve to resist deadly cancer

Study could direct future research on cancer remission, recurrence.Tasmanian devils are evolving in response to a highly lethal and contagious form of cancer, a Washington State University…

New mechanism activates the immune system against tumor cells

The body’s defences detect and eliminate not only pathogens but also tumour cells.

Dog genes give insight into human brain tumors

Dogs share more than just our homes – they also share similar cancers and genetics. Research into gliomas recently received a helping hand from our four-legged friends.

Gamma-retroviruses preferentially integrate near cancer-associated genes

Profiling gamma-retrovirus integration sites may be a new tool to identify genes promoting specific cancers.

New form of transmissible cancer found in Tasmanian devils

Devil facial tumor disease is a contagious cancer threatening to wipe out Tasmanian devils. Now, researchers have identified a second form of transmissible cancer in the animals.

Scientists investigated molecular processes for targeted dog cancer therapy

Almost every second dog above the age of ten years develops cancer. Modern tumor therapy combines surgery, radiation therapy and novel drug treatment options.

Archives