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Veterinary News From Medical News Today

Veterinary News From Medical News Today has written 574 posts for VET NEWS

Watch out for mosquitoes, ticks, and fleas, warn the CDC

CDC officials are concerned that diseases borne by fleas, mosquitoes, and ticks are on the rise, and new viruses have been introduced to the United States.

How dogs could help us explore our own gut health

The proverbial best friends of humankind give us unconditional love and moments of joy. But can they also enrich our knowledge of our own gut microbiomes?

Sheep disease toxin shines a light on multiple sclerosis

A sheep disease has parallels with multiple sclerosis. A study identifies antibodies to the toxin in humans, providing clues as to the condition’s origin.

How cats could help to treat HIV

A study has unraveled the structure of a protein that fuels drug resistance in feline immunodeficiency virus. The finding may lead to new HIV treatments.

Platypus milk: The key to preventing deadly infections?

Everyone knows that the platypus is an oddball. However, platypus milk might help us find a solution to a pressing problem: antibiotic resistance.

How can we overcome loneliness?

Loneliness is an epidemic and a major risk factor for premature death, recent research suggests. So what can we do to prevent and overcome it?

How to identify papular urticaria

Learn about papular urticaria, a skin reaction to insect bites. Bumps, which may resemble blisters, appear on the skin. The breakout can happen repeatedly. The skin reacts to bites from carpet beetles, bedbugs, and other insects. We examine the symptom…

Squirrels and stroke treatment: What’s the connection?

The process by which the brains of ground squirrels are protected against low oxygen during hibernation could lead to a new treatment for ischemic stroke.

Your dog could help you live longer

Your pooch is not just great company. A new study finds that our four-legged friends could reduce the likelihood of premature death.

Bugs in the basement? Here’s why

A new study of arthropods in 50 U.S. homes suggests that their diversity is influenced more by access to the outdoors than the behavior of human residents.

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